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Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

MSF has received UNITAID grants since 2013. For several financial, operational and opportunistic reasons, the opportunity and adequacy of receiving funds from UNITAID was questioned by the MSF medical and operational directors. In October 2014 the MedOp platform took a decision not to seek any further UNITAID funding for a one-year period-ending in October 2015.

This evaluation was conducted by Nicole Henze on behalf of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit of MSF. Finalised in November 2015. This publication was produced at the request of MSF MedOp, under the management of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Nicole Henze.
30/12/2015

During the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, MSF built a number of Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs). MSF set up centres in the three countries at different moments and with different MSF Operational Sections, which resulted in a heterogenic collection of solutions. This review was conducted jointly for all MSF operational centers (OCs). It was commissioned by OCA and was conducted as part of the OCB Ebola review. 

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCA coordinated within a broader review on OCB's response to the Ebola emergency, under the management of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Veronica Sanchez Carrera.
01/12/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
19/10/2015

Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
01/10/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
30/09/2015

Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
30/09/2015
Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.
by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
21/09/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
16/09/2015

An external evaluation of the support programs has been conducted between April and June 2015. This 360° snapshot was aiming at evaluating the appropriateness, the effectiveness and the impact of the support activities operated from Turkey and Lebanon.

Stockholm Evaluation Unit. Ofelia Garcia (lead evaluator)
30/07/2015

This is the internal reflection report for OCAs Ebola intervention in Sierra Leone. While there are numerous workshops and reflections being organized across theMSF movement, and this OCA report may form part of the larger process, its primary function willreflect on how we as OCA responded, what we learnt, and what we need to do for possible futureepidemics. The report covers discussions around Operational Decision Making, HQ setup and field supprt, Biosafety, Cinical care in EMCs and Duty of care to our international staff.

Vicky Treacy-Wong
01/06/2015

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