Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as Alternatively, if you are interested in receiving a copy of an evaluation report, please contact us

To address protection, however, is to address the question of our responsibility and role when confronted with violence, in the context of healthcare. Has this question been settled once and for all within MSF? In order to provide elements for a reply, the study looks at the practices and discourse, both past and present, employed by MSF (headquarters, field teams, individuals) when faced with situations of violence affecting either the population in general, or the people we assist.

Judith Soussan

This survey investigates patients’ coping mechanisms and their dependence on medical institutions both from the patients’ standpoint and from that of MSF’s project teams.

Marc Le Pape and Suzanne Bradol

A series of failures was the starting point for this analysis. Several outbreaks of hepatitis E, transmitted via the water supply, occurred in refugee and IDP sites in the Sahel (Sudan in 2004, and Chad in 2007) and in central Africa (Central African Republic in 2002, and Uganda in 2007). MSF was responsible for all or part of the water supply, as well as medical care. These outbreaks are a reminder that significant infectious risks persists even after we implement our usual procedures.

Jean-Hervé Bradol, Francisco Diaz, Jérôme Léglise, Marc Le Pape

Through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF’s history since 2003, this series of case studies and historical accounts describes the evolution of MSF's humanitarian ambitions, the resistance to these ambitions and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so).

edited by Claire Magone, Michaël Neuman, Fabrice Weissman

Four years after the 2005 Niger crisis, many things have changed in the nutrition field. This cahier aims at considering this evolution and exploring new possibilities for action for MSF: how can these changes  get MSF to reconsider its own goals and move its areas of intervention? How can new knowledge and the experience gained by our teams since the crisis in Niger lead to new operational ambitions?

Jean-Hervé Bradol, Jean-Hervé Jézéquel

This study sheds light on the mechanisms producing the official data used by humanitarian aid decision makers. It views Early Warning Systems (EWS) as tools that facilitate consensus between the decision-makers involved in the allocation of food aid, enabling them to reach institutional agreements. This argument is strengthened by a socio-theoretical analysis and by ethnographic observation of experts' practice in Ethiopia (2002-2004), whose results of food aid evaluations appear as a combination of empirical and political factors.

François Enten

This cahier combines a study of the experience and positions of MSF vis-à-vis occupation contexts since the 1980s, and the minutes of a debate with speakers from outside the organisation, exploring the ambiguities of the notion of occupation, the specificities of certain conflict situations and the ensuing operational and political issues for humanitarian organisations. 

Xavier Crombé