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MSF had been working in Honduras and Guatemala in HIV prevention and care of people living with HIV and AIDS for several years before ART projects were started in 2001. In 2005 the projects were handed over to the National AIDS Programme, though MSF-CH kept some staff in both countries to monitor progress. This evaluation was planned a year and a half after handing over the project, to document the perception of people regarding lessons learnt; whether the project was handed over properly; and the quality of care for people living HIV.


MSF-CH did rehabilitate the Mundari hospital in Kajo Keji County (KKC) and did support the existing OPD from September 1997 onward. Environmental- and political factors and an estimated high HIV prevalence did lead to the decision to implement the first time an integrated HIV/AIDS component (2005). Towards the end of the project it was decided that the handover process, as well as the HIV integrated approach and the capacity build during the last 9 years of presence in KKC should be evaluated.


The political context toward HIV and AIDS in South Africa is particularly difficult with a government denying the seriousness of the epidemic, with a minister of health undermining confidence in HIV program, not supporting policy changes nor fully budgeting for HIV program, promoting beetroots, lemon and olive oil to treat AIDS. This paper examines the organisation of the project and the handover

Guillaume Jouquet

The project in Lichinga is a vertical program addressing HIV/Aids in one of the northern provinces of Mozambique. The approach of integrating activities in the existing health services is rather new, hence it was felt important to evaluate the current strategy in order to support future planning and draw lessons. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess whether the integration and decentralization strategies are appropriate and efficient in order to reach to overall objective of the project. The evaluation was carried out between Mid May and Mid June 2005, by two evaluators.