This study was conducted to help identify factors for improving compliance to the programme, linkage and retention to care. The objectives included providing information and recommendations to the project team in order to support their understanding of local culture, health care perceptions and mobility patterns of the local fishing population, helping the team to formulate adapted messages and medical strategies as well as providing reports and tools to the project team to improve medical activities.

Since MSF’s return to Afghanistan in 2009, its operations on the ground have been monitored with a spyglass, unlike any other mission in this kind of environment. Consequently, OCs have been pushed to innovate but also remain critical vis-a-vis their respective strategies and the overall modus operandi of the Afghan mission. This evaluation of the single representation set up aims to analyse and learn from the current state of affairs of the Afghan mission in view of possible ways forward.

MSF OCG’s Initiative for Medical Innovation (2IM) has successfully introduced the beginnings of a change in organisational culture through a number of innovation projects. Every department has now adopted the notion of innovation and risk taking and a mindset of challenging the status quo. We have found evidence that the 2IM Initiative has, with a degree of success, started to address an identified latent risk aversion in OCG. Any form of organisational change must be expected to lead to tensions within the status quo, and to some extend this was even intended and deemed necessary.

SSP was formed in the aftermath of a high profile depot crisis in South Africa in 2012/3, with six organisations, already dealing with drug stock outs joining forces to tackle the issue. The different organisations brought different skills to the table. Largely focused on anti-retrovirals (ARVs) and TB medication, from the beginning the SSP has tasked itself to hold government accountable, to perform a watchdog role and to present the patient view on stock outs.

With the deterioration of the political context in Burundi since April 2015 more than 140,000 refugees have arrived in Tanzania. The refugees are hosted in three camps in Kigoma region, together with 83,000 Congolese refugees living in Nyarugusu camp for almost 20 years. The initial influx of Burundi refugees coincided with a cholera outbreak in Kigoma region, which triggered an immediate MSF emergency response in May 2015. This rapidly shifted with the movement of refugees from the lake shore of Tanganyika to the Nyarugusu camp.

In late 2013 and early 2014, thousands of people fled the Central African Republic (CAR) to neighbouring Cameroon. MSF OCG provided health care to the refugee population in Garoua-Boulai and Gbiti, which was characterized by high mortality rates, malnutrition rates over twice the emergency threshold and an uncontrolled measles outbreak.

Integration of HIV/TB services is one of the priorities for the MSF movement since 2010 and in particular for OCBA that started hand over of the so-called vertical programs in the same year. This process has finished for the total of 16 vertical HIV programs of MSF-OCBA started since 2005. Integration aims to provide access to HIV/TB care to all populations in need in locations where MSF has implemented regular projects, regardless of the HIV prevalence in places such as CAR (started in 2008), South Sudan (2011) and Niger (2014).

In 2008, the global economic crisis had raised fears of a serious decline in the fundraising resources of the Movement. As a consequence, mechanisms to strengthen solidarity between sections and operational centres (OCs) were set up and an assessment of fundraising potential was launched to understand trends and make income projections. The Fundraising Assessment of South Korea highlighted the strong potential for fundraising in a young and receptive society anxious to show to the world its shift from being a receiving country to becoming a donor one.

In 2012, MSF OCB stepped up its end to end Supply chain capability launching an ‘End-2-End Supply Chain Reform’, with the goal to optimize the supply of OCB operations“OCB Supply Unit” was created - integrating all OCB supply chain activities (HQ, MSF Supply and field). The responsibility of this Supply Unit extends from the customer, until the complete satisfaction of its request.. This report is the latter of three evaluations dedicated to looking at the whole reform, focusing at capitalising on the internal customer point of view.

The Medical Unit (MU; previously Project Unit) in MSF Australia was established in 2005 to develop a co-ownership of the field operations and expand MSF Australia’s involvement with MSF OCP. Today it includes technical advice for OCP operations as well as training and communication on activities relating to women and child health. The objective of the reflective was to summarize and analyse the contribution of the Medical Unit of MSF Australia to reproductive, women’s and children’s health within the operational capability of MSF OCP.

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