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Evaluation reports are either openly accessible via pdf download, or accessible via MSF's internal Sharepoint, which is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and resulting content. However, there are ongoing discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

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Through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF’s history since 2003, this series of case studies and historical accounts describes the evolution of MSF's humanitarian ambitions, the resistance to these ambitions and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so).

edited by Claire Magone, Michaël Neuman, Fabrice Weissman
22/11/2011

The evaluation looks at the process for managing MSF-OCP's construction/rehabilitation projects since 2012. The main problems identified are not related to the process itself, but the way it is put into application. The main users pointed out the long delays (periods of indicision) as being the biggest difficulty, followed by budget/cost issues (cost/m² estimates) , and the quality of constructions (techniques, materials, etc). One of the root causes of delays relates to unclear/incomplete definition of roles and responsibilities = actions to take.

Nicolas Bérubé & Vincent Brown
16/07/2015

MSF OCB commissioned an extensive multi-sectoral critical review of its Ebola intervention. The summary report highlights key findings from all specific reports and draws global conclusions. Lessons have been identified both, for future large scale emergency responses as well as for a next Ebola response. Many of lessons identified are not entirely new, but their importance has been strongly accentuated by the extremity of this health crisis. Priority recommendations are listed in the summary report, while specific recommendations are made in the respective reports.

The following persons have contributed to this report: Virginie Adams, Dr Marie-Pierre Allié, Pierre Beurrier, Murray Biedler, Elio de Bonis, Prof. Robert Colebunder, David Curtis, Gillian Dacey, Veronique de Clerck, Dr Javier Gabaldon, Xavier Henry, Francois Mounis and Veronica Sanchez.
26/04/2016

During the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, MSF built a number of Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs). MSF set up centres in the three countries at different moments and with different MSF Operational Sections, which resulted in a heterogenic collection of solutions. This review was conducted jointly for all MSF operational centers (OCs). It was commissioned by OCA and was conducted as part of the OCB Ebola review. 

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCA coordinated within a broader review on OCB's response to the Ebola emergency, under the management of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Veronica Sanchez Carrera.
01/12/2015

The objective of this review was to assess the response of OCG, focusing on the Freetown Prince of Wales Ebola Treatment Centre, Sierra Leone (open Dec 2014 to end of Feb 2015) and to reflect on the ability to incorporate “real time lessons learned” during the ongoing management of the outbreak. The evaluation focused on operational infrastructure management (including laboratories), medical & nursing care management, epidemiological control measures, community engagement & mobilisation, capacity building, relationship with other actors and research. 

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCG, under the management of the Vienna Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Claire Bayntun and Stuart Alexander Zimble.
03/05/2016

This is the internal reflection report for OCAs Ebola intervention in Sierra Leone. While there are numerous workshops and reflections being organized across theMSF movement, and this OCA report may form part of the larger process, its primary function willreflect on how we as OCA responded, what we learnt, and what we need to do for possible futureepidemics. The report covers discussions around Operational Decision Making, HQ setup and field supprt, Biosafety, Cinical care in EMCs and Duty of care to our international staff.

Vicky Treacy-Wong
01/06/2015

2005 was marked by two major natural calamities, the tsunami waves in South East Asia and the earthquake in Kashmir, Pakistan. Both of them were followed by a large intervention of MSF. After the initial assessment, MSF Belgium concentrated his efforts on the district of Bagh. The report will focus on the first 3 months of the intervention. As only a few documents are available, it was requested to reconstitute a chronology of intervention. Secondly, when there was time available, a short description and appreciation of the interventions of the other MSF sections was asked.

William Claus
01/04/2006

The Gondama Referral Centre (GRC) project is a reference hospital set up by Médecins Sans Frontières – Operational Centre Brussels (MSF-OCB) to provide secondary level healthcare to children under 15 and pregnant and lactating women in Gondama, Bo district in Sierra Leone. The Ministry of Health (MoH) having recently launched a free healthcare policy for the same target group1 provides a window of opportunity for MSF to gradually hand over its activities.

Guillaume Jouquet and Alexis Eggermont
01/07/2010

MSF Operational Centre Barcelona Athens (OCBA) conducted an evaluation of MSF’s withdrawal from Liberia and the transfer of the Benson Hospital – managed since 2005 by MSF OCBA - to the Ministry of Health. The aim is to gain knowledge through this handover process. The preceding evaluation on the Benson Hospital project, carried out in August 2008 (S. Delaunay; S Girvin) recognised that, for MSF OCBA, deciding on the most appropriate withdrawal process would be a challenge.

Géraldine Brun
13/07/2010

MSF has been present in the Nchelenge region since 1998, when a program was started to provide health care to Angolan and Congolese refugees who had arrived in the region. The MSF project in Nchelenge District was started in April 2001 because of lack of access to HIV/AIDS care in an area with an HIV prevalence estimated at 16.5%. The objective was to achieve a high coverage of treatment and care, and at the same time provide a model for decentralised programs to bring HIV/AIDS treatment and care to all people in Zambia and for MSF Holland/OCA more widely.

Kamalini Lokuge, Robert Musopole and Mupundu Banda
01/02/2010

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